London mayor seeks to tighten construction vehicle emissions standards

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Construction vehicles that fail to comply with emissions legislation in London could be less likely to avoid retribution if the city’s mayor gets the greater power he is pushing for.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan is keen to increase the powers available to him to ensure emission standards for construction vehicles are adhered to and has called on central government to support him.

In a letter to the UK’s secretary of state for environment, food and rural affairs, Michael Gove, Khan has explained that the non-road mobile machinery low emission zone (NRMM LEZ) requirements are allowing non-compliant parties to avoid punishment.

“Non-transport sources contribute half of the deadly emissions in London so we need a hard-hitting plan of action to combat them similar to moves I am taking to reduce pollution from road vehicles,” Khan said.

“With more than 400 schools located in areas exceeding legal pollution levels, and such significant health impacts on our most vulnerable communities, we cannot wait any longer and I am calling on government to provide the capital with the necessary powers to effectively tackle harmful emissions from a variety of sources.”

Stage IIIA regulations have been the minimum emission standards for construction vehicles within the Greater London area since 2015 – but all building sites in the area will have to meet at least Stage IIIB requirements by 2020.

October 6, 2017

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Tom Stone is Editor of the iVT brand – which includes digital and print editions of a quarterly magazine, Off-Highway Annual, and the Advanced Lift-truck supplement, as well as the iVT website ivtinternational.com, which is updated daily with industry news, exclusive features and expert opinion. During his time at the helm of iVT Tom has met and interviewed some of the world's leading industrial vehicle OEM presidents, CEOs and MDs, and takes great pride in cementing iVT's place as the leading forum for debate within the industry, a reputation that his been built up over the brand's 25-year history.

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